Hohokam Stone Tools

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  • The Hohokam

    The Hohokam spun these fibers into yarns for weaving cloth. They also twisted the strands into sturdy rope and twine. Throughout the mountains, the Hohokam found good rocks for making stone tools. They made tools by striking stone against stone until sharp-edged flakes were released. Then, they fashioned the flakes into knives, scrapers, and

  • Hohokam Flake Tools Desert Archaeology Field Journal

    2017-06-16· Hohokam Flake Tools and the Eye of the Beholder. Posted on June 16, 2017. R. J. Sliva, Desert’s senior flaked stone analyst, has thoughts about an often-maligned set of stone artifacts. Think about the last time you used a metal tool. Maybe you sliced up a peach to make your yogurt palatable or fired up a Dremel to carve some stone beads for

  • Hohokam Wikipedia

    Hohokam (/ h oʊ h oʊ ˈ k ɑː m /) was a society located in the North American Southwest, in the areas now part of Arizona and Sonora, Mexico.Hohokam practiced a specific culture, sometimes referred to as Hohokam culture, which has been distinguished by archaeologists.People who practiced this culture can be called Hohokam as well, but more often they are distinguished as Hohokam people to

  • Native Americans -Farmers of the desert DesertUSA

    Rock exposures served as quarries for the lithic resources essential to the manufacture of weapons, stone vessels and tools. Clay deposits provided the raw material for the crafting of ceramic pots and figurines. Hohokam Origins

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  • 35 Best Hohokam artifacts images Native american

    Explore hppoodham's board "Hohokam artifacts", followed by 125 people on Pinterest. See more ideas about Native american artifacts, American indian art and Native american.

  • The Hohokam Arizona Ruins

    The Hohokam were a prehistoric people that inhabited the Sonoran desert of central Arizona from about AD 300 to AD 1400. Occupying the region around modern-day Phoenix along the Salt and Gila Rivers, the Hohokam were one of several relatively advanced

  • Indian artifacts-Hohokam "donut" stones. The large one is

    Indian artifacts-Hohokam "donut" stones. The large one is about 7". Indian artifacts-Hohokam "donut" stones. The large one is about 7". . Stone tools of Native Americans. Lot:MIXED NATIVE AMERICAN STONE TOOLS & FISH HOOKS, Lot Number:2052, Starting Bid:$150, Auctioneer:Affiliated Auctions, Auction:MIXED NATIVE AMERICAN STONE TOOLS & FISH HOOKS, Date:07:00 AM PT Aug 5th,

  • Ancient Peoples in Scottsdale from the First Hunters and

    Hohokam peoples. Spear points found in rock shelters in Northern Scottsdale are evidence that Archaic hunters frequented the Scottsdale area. Archaic people also made local rocks into stone tools. They left the evidence of their tool making activities (stone flakes) on the south and west sides of the McDowell Mountains. The west side of the

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    Created Date: 6/10/2005 8:54:21 AM

  • Ancient Peoples in Scottsdale from the First Hunters and

    Hohokam peoples. Spear points found in rock shelters in Northern Scottsdale are evidence that Archaic hunters frequented the Scottsdale area. Archaic people also made local rocks into stone tools. They left the evidence of their tool making activities (stone flakes) on the south and west sides of the McDowell Mountains. The west side of the

  • hohokam stone tools educationcare

    The Hohokam Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum. The Hohokam left these artifacts at the site over 600 years ago. Scatters of prehistoric stone tools and pottery like

  • A Sense Of Place: Hohokam Rock Art Archaeological

    2016-12-01· A Sense Of Place: Hohokam Rock Art. Because of the difficulty of interpreting rock art, its value as a diagnostic artifact has been limited. A recent study of Hohokam rock art addressed this problem by taking the unusual approach of focusing on the images’ surroundings as

  • A Brief But Fascinating History Of The Hohokam: The Valley

    2010-01-19· For knives, tools and other utensils, chert, obsidian and jasper were used. Stone axes were made from basalt. Monos and matates, the basic grinding tools of prehistoric peoples, were usually made from porous lava material. Art & Trade . The Hohokam have been called by some anthropologists, the Prehistoric Merchants of the Southwest. It is

  • Hohokam rock art at smp

    The Hohokam also left behind artifacts such as stone tools and pottery in various canyons within South Mountain Park. Some of these artifacts are now on display at Pueblo Grande Museum. If you see pottery pieces or sharpened rock tools, they are the remnants of ancient Hohokam activities, and should remain where you find them. Follow the

  • Hohokam, Ancient Peoples of Tucson, Arizona Go! Learn Things

    In the case of the Hohokam, they also left behind remains of extensive farming and irrigation systems. This irrigation system is a unique artifact of the Hohokam culture. It is believed that the Hohokam resided in the southern Arizona region from around 400-1400 AD . For unknown reasons the people vanished at about 1400. Most theories suggest

  • Late Hohokam Stone Tools From AZ U: 9:100 ASU La Follette

    Late Hohokam Stone Tools From AZ U: 9:100 ASU La Follette (thesis). Condition is Good. Includes foldout maps, charts and pictures Please see pictures. 250 pages INV#EAS01. Seller assumes all responsibility for this listing. Shipping and handling. This item will ship to United States, but the seller has not specified shipping options. Contact the seller- opens in a new window or tab and request

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  • Hohokam Encyclopedia

    HOHOKAM. HOHOKAM is the name given by archaeologists to a prehistoric culture centered along the Salt, Gila, Verde, and Santa Cruz Rivers in the low, hot Sonoran desert of southern Arizona between approximately 300 b.c. and a.d. 1450. The name Hohokam means "those who have gone" in the language of the O'odham, the contemporary Native American inhabitants of southern Arizona.

  • Hohokam: Shell Artisans National Park Service

    Hohokam sites is the carved shell bracelet (more probably armlets) made from a whole Glycymeris (a type of bivalve-clam) shell that came from the Gulf of California. Hohokam artisans used no fewer than 43 genera and 62 species of marine shell to fabricate a rich variety of ornaments and goods. 1 Using stone tools, shell was cut,

  • Hohokam Tools Seen here from back to front is likely a

    2008-12-31· Hohokam Tools. Seen here from back to front is likely a foreshaft for a spear or dart, a maul with a stone cobble hafted to a wood handle, and a likely deer metapodial (foot bone) that has been split and sharpened to a point for punching holes in leather.

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  • Hohokam WikiVisually

    Hohokam (/ h oʊ h oʊ ˈ k ɑː m /) was a society located in the North American Southwest, in the areas now part of Arizona and Sonora, Mexico. Hohokam practiced a specific culture, sometimes referred to as Hohokam culture, which has been distinguished by archaeologists.

  • Hohokam Stone Axe TreasureNet

    2012-03-01· Hohokam Stone Axe A friend, who knew I was interested in artifacts, called and told me they had just plowed a field on his uncle's ranch. In the past he had found arrowheads and pottery shards there, and new stuff popped up whenever they plowed it.

  • Anasazi Hohokam Mogollon Indians of the Southwest

    2010-08-30· Between A.D. 300 and 500, the Hohokam constructed over a thousand miles of irrigation canals. Some of these canals were up to fifty feet wide and dug with massive organized labor using stone tools (Walker). Hohokam settlements were spread from the Tucson Basin, into the Phoenix area, and as far north as present-day Flagstaff. Located between

  • Hohokam Mano and Metate • Culture • Hohokam

    2008-04-19· A metate (or mealing stone) is a mortar, a ground stone tool used for processing grain and seeds. Mano is a ground stone tool used with a metate to process or grind food by hand. Manos and metates were made across the prehistoric southwest by all the agricultural tribes. As corn was a staple in Hohokam diets, manos and metates were needed in

  • Hohokam Infogalactic: the planetary knowledge core

    The term Hohokam, borrowed from the Akimel O'odham, is used to define an archaeological culture that existed from the beginning of the common era to about the middle of the 15th century.As an abstract construct, this culture was centered on the middle Gila River and lower Salt River drainages, [clarification needed] in what is known as the Phoenix basin.

  • Talk:Hohokam Wikipedia

    Another important food source for the Hohokam were the beans of the mesquite tree. Mesquite beans were collected and ground with a stone mortar and pestle called a metate. The mesquite flour was used for broths, breads, and stews. However, the Hohokam were not completely dependent on crops or gathering -- they also hunted. Hunting allowed the

  • hohokam stone tools educationcare

    The Hohokam Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum. The Hohokam left these artifacts at the site over 600 years ago. Scatters of prehistoric stone tools and pottery like these are common in the Tucson Mountains;...

  • American Indian Hohokam Axe axes, hohokam, prehistoric

    axes, hohokam, prehistoric, tools Developed, unridged, 3/4 groove axe. A descendant of the earlier pronounced ridge form, remnants of ridges remain above and below the

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    Get the best deal for Stone Axe from the largest online selection at eBay. Browse our daily deals for even more savings! Free shipping on many items!

  • Stone & Shell Artifacts THE PREHISTORIC COLLECTOR

    A Hammerstone (also known as a "pounder" or "pounding stone") is a fist-sized chunk of tough material such as basalt, agate, chert, rhyolite, quartz, petrified wood, igneous stone or other like stone native to the given area. They are the most common artifact and probably the most widely used tool of the prehistoric Native American. These tools